winspire

Nurturing a diverse and inclusive work environment is of utmost priority at Wipro. We believe that having a diverse workforce is not only important for our business, in fact, it is essential as it promotes an inclusive culture that benefits every stakeholder. To achieve the same, we have embarked on a journey called 'winspire, that ranks talent over everything else.

What we mean by diversity?

Diversity can be understood as a wide variety of differences or similarities/dimensions among people. e.g. gender, race/ethnicity, age, language, education, geography, nationality, disability, sexual orientation, work experience, and role. Simply put, it is a demographic makeup of teams/organization.

Why is inclusion critical for us?

Inclusion emphasizes encouraging participation, leveraging and integrating diversity into everyday working. It is all about valuing the differences and celebrating the uniqueness among individuals with respect; creating a workplace where an employee is accepted; and treated as an insider by others in a team. In an inclusive organization people feel welcomed, respected, engaged, recognized and motivated: there is an overall sense of belonging. Diversity and inclusion, together are a potent force. Hence, as an organization, we do not look at just the numbers, graphs or metrics of how diverse we are. We want to build a truly inclusive work environment.

Wipro's Diversity & Inclusion Charter

GENDER
PERSONS WITH DISABILITY
anchored
UNDER PRIVILEGED
NATIONALITY
Priti Kataria
My 19 plus years long journey at Wipro has been full of excitement and thrill. From the day I joined from campus, it has been an enriching and learning experience, at every step and milestone. The early responsibilities and the amazing trust the organization has in our capabilities has made me the professional I am today. Wipro is a place with a strong value system which I can always relate to. It is ‘fun’ and ‘you look forward’ to work here every day. It is an organization where people can make a difference, have a point of view of their own and feel free to express themselves. The canvas is huge and you have a choice to create your own picture with various colors of experience and your passion and urge to make an impact. The opportunities are boundary-less. You have to take the plunge.
Wipro Journey
  • 1998

    Senior HR Executive – Part of the Corporate HR team
  • 2000

    Regional Resource Manager - North and East (India Region, Talent Acquisition team)
  • 2002

    Regional HR Manager - North Region (India), Wipro Infotech
  • 2005

    Head HR – Manage IT Services (PSD), Wipro Infotech
  • 2009

    Head HR – Professional Services Division (PSD), Wipro Infotech
  • 2012

    Global HR lead - Global Infrastructure Services (GIS) including India & Middle East, Data Centre Services (DCS); plus anchored the charter for Chairperson – PSHC (Prevention of Sexual Harassment Committee), Wipro Limited, Jan 2013 - Jan 2017
  • 2013 to 2016

    Chairperson – PSHC (Prevention of Sexual Harassment Committee), Wipro Limited
  • 2016 Onwards

    Vice President and Global HR Head - Manufacturing and Technology, Wipro Limited; Heading the Wipro Cares, Mumbai Chapter and working with Leadership Development team.
Initiatives
  • #1

    Represented Wipro at Women Leadership Forum (NHRD)
  • #2

    Led Prevention of Sexual Harassment Committee (PSHC) for 3 plus years
  • #3

    Been the coach for Internal HR Enablement
  • #4

    Led Global Infrastructure Services (GIS) Integration working seamlessly integrating the India, ME GIS and global GIS units along with acquired entity DCS
Rituparna Ghosh
I started my career in 2001 as the Corporate Brand Manager with Wipro. In the last six years, I have grown up the ranks. At Wipro, the output is what matters, and not number of hours you put in. Wipro gives leaders the flexibility to balance their work and life. I have learnt a number of things at Wipro to become a thorough professional. Each day, I realize that my competition is with myself. I aspire to do better than what I did the day before and Wipro has always supported me in my endeavors.
Wipro Journey
  • 2001 – 2002

    Corporate Brand Manager
  • 2002 – 2003

    National Distribution Manager, Wipro Infotech
  • 2003 – 2011

    Practice Head, Process Excellence Practice
  • 2011 – 2017

    General Manager & Head : Continuous Improvement
  • 2017 – till date

    Agile Transformation, Wipro Digital
Initiatives
  • #1

    2003 : Established the marketing and solution design function in Consulting
  • #2

    2010 : Grew consulting in European to $ 50 mn with 92% CAGR and 500 people team
  • #3

    2009 : $15 mn win for Release and Deployment Management in BT IT
  • #4

    2011 : Relaunched the Lean (Lean 2.0) and Agile (AgileNext) initiatives
  • #5

    2015 : Launched Enterprise Agility, a change management framework for scaling Agile across the organisation
Rachel Wilson

What aspects of mountain climbing resonates most with your own journey so far?

I guess for me when you climb a mountain you never really know what’s around the corner. You can think that you’re going to be climbing in good weather and within a couple of minutes things can change. That, for me, is how life is and it’s how my life has been. Also, when climbing a mountain, you can either do it the hard way or you can do it the easy way. There’re always options. And that for me, is about my life’s journey. I’ve never really known what’s around the corner, I do know how things can dramatically change and I actually have the freedom to choose which path I take along my journey. I can do it the easy way or I can do it the hard way. And, actually, it’s better to climb with friends so that’s a bit like my own journey.

Tell us a little about your journey in life so far.

I think it’s been an amazing life. I’ve had some fantastic opportunities, there have also been some challenges thrown my way. The opportunities that I’ve had in the last seven years of Wipro have hugely opened my eyes in so many different ways, in terms of the travel, the cultures, and the type of work that I’ve done. Life for me is definitely a cup half full rather than a cup half empty. Life is fantastic and if we don’t learn and grow from the challenges that we’ve been given, then life really isn’t there for the taking.

After battling the odds of cancer, has your perspective towards life changed in any way? And how?

I think we all think that we are invincible but sometimes when you face something like that (cancer) you know that you’re not. You actually have to live each day as if it were your last. A big question to ask anybody is ‘how would you like to be remembered?’ and that really made me think, particularly when you come up against some of the challenges that I’ve had. I started to think about ‘do I want to be remembered for what I’ve achieved, or how?’ and for me, the real importance was ‘how?’. Did you achieve success with kindness and compassion and integrity? So, it really made me think about how life is about living and live each day as if it is your last, live in that moment but also think about how you would like to be remembered. It changes how you deal with people. I would want people to think I was kind, that I was fair, that I was funny and maybe a bit different. But it’s not just about success and achievement, it’s actually about what you’ve done as a person, and how you’ve treated people.

What would be the one mantra in your life, that you would like to share?

I think for me it’s captured in something called the serenity prayer which I repeat almost on a daily basis. It says, ‘Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference’. That’s the mantra for me. I couldn’t change the diagnosis but what I could change was how I reacted to it. My reaction was something that was in my power. I could decide if that was going to be a positive reaction or a negative reaction, and that for me is a mantra for any challenge in life.

What would you consider as the source of your inner strength?

My biggest source of strength is my faith as a Christian and that has really taken me through some rough times. I have amazing friends and family. The support I received at work, at Wipro, was insurmountable and I pull on it from all the different areas in my life.

What makes Wipro a great place to belong?

I think it is very personal, but when I’m talking to graduates and apprentices…when I’m selling them the Wipro dream… I can sell it to them, because I actually really believe in it. I think Wipro offers a choice, it offers the ability to be creative. We have methodology in terms of the way we work but actually we are allowed to be creative. So, if you have a great idea, but you have somebody confining you, and saying “no, you can’t do this”, “you can’t run with this idea”, “it’s not possible”…you actually have people at Wipro saying, “yeah go with it”, “run with it.

For me, Wipro represents freedom to think. We’ve got a hugely diverse employee population in terms of cultures. We still need to work really hard on our culture and diversity and that’s being recognized. I’ve worked on loads of different accounts. I’ve worked with some really crazy, creative people. I’ve worked with people far more intelligent than myself, but there is also a humility to the people that work at Wipro and I really like that. So, when I’m talking to graduates and they ask, “what’s it like to work at Wipro?”, I say to them, ‘this is a great place, you’re not over-managed and you don’t have somebody pouncing on your shoulder every day’. And if you can work like that, then it’s a great place for you’. And I think there are so many opportunities, and you’re not doing the same job for more than 12 to 16 months.

Give us a little insight on how you approach your work.

I think it’s really funny because we all get a little hung up about status, success and achievement, but for me, considering everything I’ve gone through, there is more to life than that. I was having a conversation this morning with Robert Racine, and he is the Senior Vice President, he’s my boss, and he was saying ‘don’t be one dimensional’, ‘don’t define yourself as a software engineer’. What about, “I’m a great colleague to somebody”, “I’m a great friend to somebody”, “I’m a great mother”, “I’m a great stepmother”, “I’m a great team player in my sports team or in my work team”. I think my personal experiences have really made me see things a little differently. There’s a great question, by my husband, who is a vicar, he often says to people, when they are at the end of life, and he says, “What is one of your biggest regrets?” and they never say, “I spent too much time working”. It’s normally, “I didn’t spend enough time with my family”. Don’t let work define you. But also, I’m incredibly grateful for the skills that I have, and every Sunday my prayer is, ‘did I use those skills widely and effectively in my working week?’ I’m also very thankful for the job that I’ve got but work doesn’t define me, I do see it as a big part of my life.

Tell us a little about your experiences with mountain climbing.

It’s not something that was ever really on my agenda when I was younger. There’s also a sense of ‘can I do this?’. Then there’s also the excitement that am I actually going to climb this really, really big mountain. And there’s a real sense of freedom and this great sense of challenge. For me though there’s this eagerness to reach the top, but when you get to the top it’s also about getting back down safely. So, it’s all about stuff that I would call, ‘outside your comfort zone’ and one of the things that I coach people on is about getting out of their comfort zones and it’s all about the stuff that you experience outside your comfort zone - it’s stress, excitement, fear. It’s one of the most amazing experiences.

What are your overarching feelings when you take an activity such as mountain climbing?

This time, when I did the three peaks, my actual thoughts during that time were about this little boy Felix who has muscular dystrophy. I was really thinking about him because, here’s me, worried about how I’m going to climb this mountain, ‘Am I fit enough?’, ‘How am I going to do it?’, ‘I’m scared’ and I thought about the challenges that that little boy and his family are going to face and that’s far tougher than any mountain that any of us can climb in a lifetime. This is a disease that is fatal to children. They will die by the time they are in their early 20s, mostly. And those were my thoughts on that occasion.

What are the things that typically occupy your mind space when you are climbing?

I’m very reflective when I climb. I don’t listen to music, because I’d probably either fall over or get so distracted looking around listening to Gloria Gaynor, I might give myself an injury (chuckles). I tend not to listen to music but I do have my thoughts to myself. I might have a little prayer, I think about my family, I think about crazy silly things. It’s quite a poignant time being on the mountain and it does make me think about stuff that maybe at the back of your mind, but you don’t really have the headspace for when you’re at work or travelling to work to touch, sit and just think about. You’ve got 6 hours on your own and that’s a great time for headspace.

What would be your message to the people who hope to be just as daring as you, but are afraid?

Age is no barrier. Try taking yourself out of the comfort zone into something we call the “stretch zone”, it’s also called the learning zone. You don’t learn unless you push yourself out of your comfort zone. You won’t learn about yourself and you won’t learn about the things that are out there around you. I always say that the day you stop learning is the day you die. Don’t let that part of you die.
Wade Davey

Tell us about your interest in Lego. How did it begin and when did it begin?

It started basically when my brother had kids and my nephews were around the age when I needed to start buying them presents. I was going down to the local toy shop and having a look through all of the toys and Lego came up. I remember having some Lego when I was a child. But I wanted to get some Lego for my nephew. Then I sort of looked at the more advanced sets and the one that caught my eye was the VW Kombi set and I bought that and built it myself with the idea of passing it to my nephew and it hasn’t quite made it to them yet! My own collection has grown from there and I’ve gotten around 600 sets in my collection at the moment!

Tell us a little about Brickvention? How did you stumble upon this cause?

Brickvention is a convention that happens in January in Melbourne. It’s basically the long weekend in January. It has about 600 exhibitors who build Legos themselves or bring their Lego sets to a big convention hall and we have around 50,000 people attend it over the weekend, raising money for charity. The charity is Fairybricks, which basically donates toys and Legos to sick kids in hospitals around Christmas time. So, we do the exercise of donating the whole charity fund-raising for them as people come along and build Legos and look at all the models we make.
Kimber Lyhusk

Tell us a little about how you got associated with the Special Olympics.

My sister was dating a gentleman who was asked to start the roller-skating division for the state of Ohio. He worked in the same building as Special Olympics and they knew he was a roller-skater so they asked him to establish a roller-skating program in his second year and he needed some help. He asked me if I would come to Columbus, Ohio for the State Summer Games for Special Olympics and help him and that’s how I got started. Once I did it I was hooked!

What triggered this interest and kept you going?

I think it was the dedication and perseverance that I saw in the athletes. They never gave up, they just kept going, they just had a really good attitude. I’ve always believed that the more you have, the more you are required to give back. I felt like I have more by the way of mental aptitude than a lot of the athletes did and they needed you there, and I felt like it was a requirement really for me to be able to help people that are less fortunate than me, and after seeing them, it was just more of a gift to me than to them.

What has been one of your major life lessons with your association to the Special Olympics?

My most recent experience would be during an artistic dance roller-skating competition at the Summer Games this year. We had two women athletes who tied for first place. Normally you would think that someone would be upset because they have to share the accolades of the gold medal of first place, but they were so excited that both of them won first place, they were jumping up and down, crying, hugging each other. It brought all of us to tears just to see the kind of attitude that they had.

How do you maintain your work-life balance? What keeps you on your toes?

Well, I have a 19-year-old son who keeps me alive and kicking that’s for sure! As far as some of the things I would like to do in my spare time…I like to make jewelry, it’s very relaxing to me and by doing that I get to also contribute to another organizations that have fund-raisers and things of that sort. I can make jewelry for them to add to their fund-raisers but that’s just one thing I really enjoy doing a lot. That, and I love to make pottery. That’s another very, very relaxing thing that I like to do.
 

The Ladder of Success

Opportunities for career growth and development within the organization are immense at Wipro. A clear and defined career path results in higher retention, a rich depth of expertise amongst employees, and invaluable loyalty towards the employer. We have some great examples to go by.
 

Employee Moments

"Coming together is a beginning, keeping together is progress, working together is success" – Henry Ford
Find the stories of ordinary people who have moved beyond their shells to achieve their own forms of success, be it the joy they found in their own lives or the joy they’ve brought to the lives of people around them.
 

TalentHive

Talent, first. Yes, at Wipro, we attribute our success to our people.

Our recruitment strategy ensures that we bring on board only the best. We handpick our team members solely on the basis of their qualifications and competencies.

We aspire on improving the demographic diversity as well as building an inclusive culture through our various Diversity & Inclusion programs.

Our hiring process

Wipro operates in over 50 countries and the recruitment process differs from geography to geography basis the laws of the land. However, we largely follow a generic process to invite applications.
Wipro was awarded a Winner for Excellence in Diversity & Inclusion at SHRM India HR Awards 2017
Wipro won Innovative Policies and Practices for Persons with Disabilities Award 2017 by Zero Project, Vienna
We are an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Wipro does not charge any fee at any stage of the recruitment process and has not authorized agencies/partners to collect any fee for recruitment. If you encounter any suspicious mail, advertisements or persons who offer jobs at Wipro, please do let us know by contacting us on helpdesk.recruitment@wipro.com